Cosmology Seminar

Cosmology Seminars are held at on Mondays at 11 am during the academic year, on the 3rd floor Varian conference room. These are more focused and less didactic than the colloquium, and provide a stage for younger researchers to present their work in more detail.  

Please contact Risa WechslerDaniel GruenJosh Meyers, or Kyle Story for more information.

TBD

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Location

Campus, Varian 355

Speaker
Hironao Miyatake (Institute for Advanced Research, Nagoya University)

Combined galaxy clustering and weak lensing analyses: Validation of parameter inference using survey simulations, and perturbative intrinsic alignment modeling

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Location

NEW LOCATION:

KIPAC Auditorium

Speaker
Niall MacCrann (CAPP, Ohio State University)

I will discuss some of the challenges involved in producing robust cosmological constraints from photometric galaxy surveys such the Dark Energy Survey and LSST.

Weak Lensing with Galaxy Clusters

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Location

Campus, Varian 355

Speaker
Melanie Simet (UC Riverside)

Weak lensing and galaxy cluster abundances are two of the cosmological probes considered to have the most power for upcoming surveys.  They have a natural connection via the use of weak lensing to calibrate the masses of galaxy clusters--a critical measurement in order to reach the promised precision of galaxy cluster cosmology.  However, there are a number of systematic effects that must be considered when making these measurements.  I will discuss some recent work in measuring galaxy cluster lensing signals and handling sources of systematic error in those measurement

Surprises in the small scale CMB

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Location

Campus, Varian 355

Speaker
Simone Ferraro (UC Berkeley)

Information about the late-time Universe is imprinted on the small scale CMB as photons travel to us from the surface of last scattering. Several processes are at play and small scale fluctuations are very rich and non-Gaussian in nature.  I will review some of the most important effects and I will focus on the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect and gravitational lensing.

TBD

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Location

Campus, Varian 355

Speaker
Song Huang (UC Santa Cruz)

Measuring masses of galaxy clusters using CMB-cluster lensing

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Location

Campus, Varian 355

Speaker
Srinivasan Raghunathan (University of Melbourne)

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound objects in the Universe and are excellent cosmological probes. Their power as cosmological probes, however, is currently limited by the systematics involved in the measurement of their mass. In this talk, I will discuss the method to estimate their masses using the weak-gravitational lensing of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). I will explain the systematics involved in the measurements and the importance of using CMB polarisation data in the future.

High Redshift Quasars: Constraining their Lifetime and the Epoch of Reionization

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Location

Campus, Varian 355

Speaker
Anna-Christina Eilers (Max Planck Institute for Astronomy)

One of the major goals in observational cosmology today is to understand how our Universe transitioned from the "dark ages", following recombination, into the ionized universe we can observe today. For this purpose we compiled a new data set of 34 high redshift (5.8<z<6.5) quasar spectra of moderate resolution, containing several new and unpublished objects, and reduced these spectra in a coherent and homogeneous way.

Tests of Cosmological Gravity

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Location

Campus, Varian 355

Speaker
Jeremy Sakstein (University of Pennsylvania)

Modern theories of dark energy can be epitomized by two words: modified gravity. In this talk I will discuss a popular and well-motivated model for dark energy, galileon gravity, and how it can be constrained using two novel astrophysical probes.

Solving the Vlasov equation in two spatial dimensions with the Schrödinger method

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Location

Campus, Varian 355

Speaker
Michael Kopp (CEICO, Institute of Physics of the Czech Academy of Sciences)

I present recent progress (Kopp, Vattis & Skordis 1711.00140) to solve the Vlasov equation via the so-called Schrödinger method (Widrow & Kaiser 1993). This technique consists of solving the Schrödinger-Poisson equation, together with a prescription to construct a phase space distribution from the wave function.

For the first time, we implemented the Schrödinger method in two spatial dimensions, extending the one-dimensional previous studies.

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