Astrophysics Colloquium

KIPAC co-hosts the Astrophysics Colloquium, held both at campus and SLAC at 11 a.m. on Thursdays.  The location can be found on our events calendar.  All interested parties are welcome to attend, and food is served.  

Please contact Becky CanningAri Cukierman, Daniel Gruen and Greg Madejski for more information.

TBD

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Location

SLAC, Kavli 3rd Floor Conf. Room

Speaker
Eliot Quataert (UC Berkeley)

TBD

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Location

SLAC, Kavli 3rd Floor Conf. Room

Speaker
Hui Li (Los Alamos)

TBD

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Location

Campus, PAB 102/103

Speaker
Tom Greene (NASA Ames)

TBD

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Location

Campus, PAB 102/103

Speaker
BJ Fulton (Caltech)

Tip the Scales: Pushing the Limits of Computational Astrophysics

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Location

SLAC, Kavli 3rd Floor Conf. Room

Speaker
Brant Robertson (University of California, Santa Cruz)

The role of computation in astrophysics has grown substantially over the last decade, driven by the growth in computer power, sophistication of computational methodologies, and increasing data volumes. Over the next decade, the importance of computational astrophysics will continue to grow as computers reach exascale performance and data-intense observational surveys like the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, Euclid, and WFIRST become available.

Cosmological Weak Lensing

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Location

SLAC, Kavli 3rd Floor Conf. Room

Speaker
Alexandre Refregier (ETH Zurich)

Weak gravitational lensing is a unique technique to map the distribution of dark matter in the universe. It is also a sensitive probe of dark energy, large scale structures in the universe, and cosmological parameters. We will first briefly describe the principles of weak lensing. We will then review the current observational status of this field, highlighting several new measurements especially from the ongoing Dark Energy Survey (DES).

TBD

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Location

Campus, PAB 102/103

Speaker
Zaven Arzoumanian (Goddard Space Flight Center)

Special Astrophysics Colloquium: Testing GR and the Massive Black Hole Paradigm with Infrared Interferometry

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Location

Campus, PAB 102/103

Speaker
Reinhard Genzel (Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, FRG & Departments of Physics & Astronomy, UC Berkeley)

Abstract: Adaptive optics (AO) imaging and spectroscopy of the central star cluster in the Galactic Center over the past three decades have established that there is a concentration of 4 million solar masses associated with the compact radio source SgrA*, presumably a massive black hole.

TBD

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Location

Campus, PAB 102/103

Speaker
Fabienne Bastien (Pennsylvania State University)
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