Astrophysics Colloquium

KIPAC co-hosts the Astrophysics Colloquium, held both at campus and SLAC at 11 a.m. on Thursdays.  The location can be found on our events calendar.  All interested parties are welcome to attend, and food is served.  

Please contact Becky CanningAri Cukierman, Daniel Gruen and Greg Madejski for more information.

The Thirty Meter Telescope International Observatory

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Location

SLAC, Kavli 3rd Floor Conf. Room

Speaker
Chuck Steidel (Caltech)

I will give an overview of TMT, a 30m-aperture, segmented mirror telescope operating with high efficiency over the entire ground-based UV/optical/near-IR window (0.3-28 microns).  I will summarize its planned instrumentation suite, its current technical status, and its role as the northern hemisphere arm of the proposed US-ELT Program.

Unraveling Elusive Cosmic Particle Mysteries with High-Energy Elusive Particles

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Location

SLAC, Kavli 3rd Floor Conf. Room

Speaker
Kohta Murase (The Pennsylvania State University)

New frontiers of astroparticle physics have been opened by IceCube's discovery of high-energy cosmic neutrinos. Their origin is a new mystery in the field, and solving this problem may enable us not only to understand the physics of astrophysical sources but also to obtain important clues about the old mystery, the origin of cosmic rays, and to utilize neutrinos as probes of neutrino properties, dark matter, and fundamental physics.

Exploring Planetary Systems Orbiting Nearby Stars

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Location

Campus, PAB 102/103

Speaker
Courtney Dressing (UC Berkeley)

The NASA Kepler mission revealed that our Galaxy is teeming with planetary systems and that Earth-sized planets are common, but most of the planets detected by Kepler orbit stars that are too faint to permit detailed study. Excitingly, the NASA Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) launched in April 2018 and is finding hundreds of small planets orbiting stars that are much closer and brighter.

Understanding the Interiors of Neutron Stars

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Location

Campus, Varian 355 *Note change in regular location*

Speaker
Cole Miller (University of Maryland)

Neutron stars have long beckoned to physicists from many fields as realms of extreme physics beyond what we can test in terrestrial laboratories.  In the realm of nuclear physics, the lure is that the cores of neutron stars are several times denser than atomic nuclei and yet are technically cold; this state is unique in the universe and holds clues to the nature of very dense mat

Exploring the Mysterious Origins of Super-Earths and Mini-Neptunes

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Location

Campus, PAB 102/103

Speaker
Heather Knutson (Caltech)

Nearly a decade has passed since the discovery that planets with sizes intermediate between that of the Earth and Neptune (“super-Earths” or “mini-Neptunes”, depending on their densities) dominate the observed population of close-in exoplanets.

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