Astrophysics Colloquium

KIPAC co-hosts the Astrophysics Colloquium, held both at campus and SLAC at 11 a.m. on Thursdays.  The location can be found on our events calendar.  All interested parties are welcome to attend, and food is served.  

Please contact Becky CanningAri Cukierman, Daniel Gruen and Greg Madejski for more information.

TBD

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Location

SLAC, Kavli 3rd Floor Conf. Room

Speaker
Keith Vanderlinde (University of Toronto)

Toward Maps of Exoplanet Surfaces

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Location

Campus, PAB 102/103

Speaker
Rodrigo Luger (CCA, Flatiron Institute)

Perhaps the simplest question that one can ask of a distant star or planet is, "What does it actually look like?" Even the best interferometers can only give us limited information about the surfaces of select giant and/or nearby stars, while the direct imaging of exoplanet surfaces is all but impossible.

TBD

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Location

Campus, PAB 102/103

Speaker
Gurtina Besla (University of Arizona)

Cosmic Extremes: Time-Domain Astrophysics in a Multi-Messenger World

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Location

Campus, PAB 102/103

Speaker
Kate Alexander (Northwestern)

Time-domain astrophysics provides a unique opportunity to study the most extreme physical processes in the Universe, including the deaths of massive stars, the destruction and creation of compact objects like neutron stars and black holes, and the tidal disruption of stars by supermassive black holes. I will discuss my recent and ongoing work to reveal the formation and structure of relativistic jets and outflows in the most extreme astrophysical transients, including gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and tidal disruption events (TDEs).

The Magnetic Milky Way in Three Dimensions

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Location

Campus, PAB 102/103

Speaker
Susan Clark (IAS)

Magnetic fields thread our Milky Way Galaxy, influencing interstellar physics from cosmic ray propagation to star formation. The magnetic interstellar medium is also a formidable foreground for experimental cosmology, particularly for the quest to find signatures of inflation in the polarized cosmic microwave background.

Opening the 21 cm Window on Our Cosmic Dawn

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Location

Campus, PAB 102/103

Speaker
Josh Dillon (UC Berkeley)

21 cm cosmology promises to become a revolutionary new 3D probe of our early universe. With it, we can uncover the astrophysics of the "Cosmic Dawn"—the era of the first stars and galaxies—and test our standard model of cosmology with exquisite precision. Realizing the potential of 21 cm cosmology requires overcoming considerable challenges; the 21 cm signal is buried under foregrounds that are orders of magnitude brighter.

TBD

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Location

Campus, PAB 102/103

Speaker
Lars Bildsten (UCSB)

The Renaissance of Astrophysics: a landscape of opportunities in the era of Time Domain Multi-Messenger investigations

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Location

Campus, PAB 102/103

Speaker
Raffaella Margutti (Northwestern)

Astronomical transients are signposts of catastrophic events in space, including the most extreme stellar deaths, stellar tidal disruptions by supermassive black holes, and mergers of compact objects. Thanks to new and improved observational facilities we can now sample the night sky with unprecedented temporal cadence and sensitivity across the electromagnetic spectrum and beyond.

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