SITP Seminar

Halometry from Astrometry

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Location

Campus, Varian 355

Speaker
Ken van Tilburg (Institute for Advanced Study / NYU)

Halometry---mapping out the spectrum, location, and kinematics of nonluminous structures inside the Galactic halo---can be realized via effects that variable weak gravitational lensing induces on the proper motions of stars and other luminous background sources. Modern astrometric surveys provide unprecedented positional precision along with a leap in the number of cataloged objects.

Cosmological signatures of sub-MeV dark matter freeze-in

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Location

Campus, Varian 312

Speaker
Katelin Schutz (UC Berkeley)

Dark matter could be a thermal relic of freeze-in, where the dark matter is produced by extremely feeble interactions with Standard Model particles dominantly at low temperatures. The simplest sub-MeV dark matter models with freeze-in include models with a kinetically-mixed dark photon mediator, or equivalently models where dark matter is millicharged under the Standard Model U(1).

Detecting Dark Blobs

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Location

Campus, Varian 312

Speaker
Dorota Grabowska (UC Berkeley)

Most current dark matter detection strategies, including both

direct and indirect efforts, are based on the assumption that the galactic

Axion Stars

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Location

Campus, Varian 355

Speaker
Eric Braaten (Ohio State University)

The particle that makes up the dark matter of the universe could be an axion or some other light boson.  A collection of  axions can condense into a gravitationally bound Bose Einstein condensate called an axion star. It is possible that a significant fraction of the axion dark matter is in the form of axion stars. This would make some efforts to identify the axion as the dark matter particle more challenging, but it would also open up new possibilities. I will summarize the basic properties of axion stars and other gravitationally bound or self-bound condensates of spin-0 particles.

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