SLAC Colloquium

Gamma-ray Bursts: Nature’s Most Remarkable Cosmic Explosions

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Speaker
Brad Cenko (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center University of Maryland) via zoom

First discovered serendipitously in 1967, the phenomena known as gamma-ray bursts - short-lived, extremely bright flashes of high-energy radiation - mystified astronomers for decades. Despite many breakthroughs, key open questions - such as the mechanism responsible for the prompt gamma-ray emission, as well as a detailed characterization of their progenitor systems - remain open.

Looking inside the heart of a supernova from underground

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Speaker
Alex Friedland (SLAC) via zoom

Core-collapse supernovae host some of the most extreme physical environments in our universe. They play a fundamental role in shaping the world around us, from seeding new star formation to spreading heavy elements around the Galaxy. The extreme physical conditions make them very valuable laboratories for particle physics, nuclear physics and astrophysics. In this talk, I will review the basic mechanism driving these gravity-powered neutrino bombs and then discuss examples of the rich physics that is imprinted on the expected neutrino signal.