KIPAC Public Lectures

Have you ever wondered how the Universe works or where it all came from? Have you ever been curious about how many planets there are out there? Or even what it would be like to fall in to a black hole?! Find out at one of our public lectures!

KIPAC Public Lectures are held once per month and are free and open to all.

Find out what we have in store for you here, or to keep up to date, sign up to our mailing list.

The Universe Continues to Reveal Surprises

-
Location

Campus, Hewlett Teaching Center, Room 201

Speaker
Wendy Freedman (Carnegie Observatories)

Over the past few decades, astronomers have for the first time identified the major constituents of the universe. Unexpectedly, the universe hardly resembles what we thought only a couple of decades ago. The universe is filled with dark matter more abundant than ordinary matter and dark energy that is causing a runaway acceleration. We do not yet have a complete picture of this unexpected universe. Some discrepancies may be hinting at new discoveries to come.

The Fastest Eye on the Sky: The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope

-
Location

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, Panofsky Auditorium

Speaker
Aaron Roodman

What is the Universe made of?  In modern cosmology only 4% of the universe is deeply understood, while the other 96%, Dark Energy and Dark Matter, remains a mystery.   The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), currently under construction, will observe billions of galaxies, billions of stars in our own galaxy the Milky Way, as well as millions of objects closer to home in the solar system.  Every night over a ten year survey, LSST will observe much of the night sky, so that every portion of the sky will be imaged nearly a thousand times.

Neutron Stars, Black Holes and Gravitational Waves

-
Location

SLAC, Panofsky Auditorium, Building 053

Speaker
Roger Blandford (KIPAC)

Black holes and neutron stars, some of the most extreme objects in the Universe, were hypothesized in the first half of the twentieth century and were discovered and observed in the second half. Astronomers are embarking on a new voyage of discovery that is being led by the recent detection of gravitational radiation and the observation of massive black holes using radio telescopes. Discover what we know and what we hope to learn from these fascinating astronomical objects.

Subscribe to KIPAC Public Lectures